Most Active Speaker

Gerrit Grunwald

Gerrit Grunwald

Senior Developer Advocate at Azul Systems

Münster, Germany

Gerrit Grunwald is a software engineer that loves coding for around 40 years already. He is a true believer in open source and has participated in popular projects like JFXtras.org as well as his own projects (TilesFX, Medusa, Enzo, SteelSeries Swing, SteelSeries Canvas). 
Gerrit blogs regularly at http://harmonic-code.org, he is an active member of the Java community, where he founded and leads the Java User Group Münster (Germany), he is a JavaOne rockstar and a Java Champion. He is a speaker at conferences and user groups internationally and writes for several magazines.

Awards

Area of Expertise

  • Physical & Life Sciences
  • Information & Communications Technology

Topics

  • Java
  • javafx
  • Java & JVM
  • Core Java / Java SE
  • Java and Server-side
  • Java Security
  • Java language
  • Java user Group Leader
  • Java in the cloud
  • Enterprise Java
  • Mobile with Java
  • Swift
  • SwiftUI
  • JavaScript
  • JavaScript & TypeScript
  • Arduino
  • esp8266
  • IoT
  • OpenJDK

What the CRaC - Superfast JVM startup

In a world where microservices are more and more a standard architecture for Java based applications running in the cloud, the JVM warmup time can become a limitation. Especially when you look at spinning up new instances of an app as response to changes in load, the warmup time can be a problem. Native images are one solution to solve these problems because their statically ahead of time compiled code simply doesn’t have to warmup and so has short startup time. But even with the shorter startup time and smaller footprint it doesn’t come without a drawback. The overall performance might be slower because of the missing JIT optimizations at runtime. There is a new OpenJDK project called CRaC (Coordinated Restore at Checkpoint) which goal it is to address the JVM warmup problem with a different approach. The idea is to take a snapshot of the running JVM, store it in files and restore the JVM at a later point in time (or even on another machine.

Welcome to the Jungle - A safari through the JVM landscape

OpenJDK with it’s Java Virtual Machine is great but there is not only one flavour but many. There is Oracle OpenJDK, Eclipse Temurin, IBM Semeru, Amazon Corretto, Azul Zulu, Alibaba Dragonwell, Huawei Bi Sheng, Tencent Kona and many more. Did you ever ask yourself which one is better, faster, free or something similar? Or do you want to know where the differences are in those distributions, well then this session might bring some answers to your questions. It will give you an idea about what the JVM is and will cover all the available distributions not only of OpenJDK but also of GraalVM and will try to explain the differences and features of the available distributions.

Wargames - Java vulnerabilities and why you should care

Java is great and we all spend time on making it more performant, more scalable and maintainable. But we better should also spend some time on making it more secure. With all that new Java releases and features also come new vulnerabilities and exploits. Because Java is everywhere, it has a huge attack surface which makes it interesting for hackers to search for vulnerabilities in Java and foremost in Java based applications. This sessions will explain what all these mystique acronyms like NVD, CVE, CVSS, CPU, PSU etc. mean and how they are related to Java security. It will also be shown what tools are available to you to check whether your Java application is vulnerable to known issues.

Trash Talk - Exploring the memory management in the JVM

In the realm of Java programming, understanding memory management and garbage collection mechanisms cannot only be helpful for optimizing performance and resource utilization but also in general will help you to use the right garbage collector for your application. This session will be about memory allocation, object lifecycle, and garbage collection strategies within the Java Virtual Machine (JVM). Attendees will gain insights into memory allocation strategies, object retention policies, and various garbage collection algorithms like generational and concurrent collection. So when you are interested in getting more knowledge about which garbage collector to use best for your application or about memory management in the JVM, this session is for you.

Gerrit Grunwald

Senior Developer Advocate at Azul Systems

Münster, Germany