Speaker

Travis Waith-Mair

Travis Waith-Mair

The Non-Traditional Developer

Houston, Texas, United States

Husband, Father, and Front-end Dev. I blog at https://non-traditional.dev, a course author at newline.co, and I am the creator/maintainer of Bedrock Layout Primitives, a library of composable layout components in React.

Area of Expertise

  • Information & Communications Technology

Topics

  • JavaScript
  • CSS
  • CSS Grid
  • CSS Flexbox
  • React
  • Open Source Software

Intro to Solid JS for React Developers

Solid.js has an API that feels very familiar to React developers, but under the hood is entirely different. Solid.js has a suite of “fine-grained reactive primitives.” It is these primitives that we will explore and learn how to use coming from the perspective of a React.js Developer.

How to Achieve Layout Composition in React

We have entered the Age of Components. Modern frameworks use components as their foundation, allowing you to break your app into simple single-purpose parts that can be composed together to solve more complex needs.

Unfortunately, CSS tends to solve problems from the top down, starting with more general rules to more specific rules. These contradictory methodologies can lead to some frustrating decisions as you try to compose your app using lower-level components.

Many tools have been created to help us manage our CSS. Tools like SASS, Less, CSS-Modules, Post-CSS, and CSS-in-JS all solve the problem of maintaining CSS style sheets, but they all fall short in the one problem that tooling can never solve: Which elements should own which style properties? This answer to this question is key to making composition work, especially where web layout is concerned. By the end of this talk, you will know the answer to this question and start composing layouts in your web app.

Stop Writing Reusable React Components

One of the biggest changes to the way we write Web apps has got to be components. This paradigm shift has allowed for web apps to scale to heights we have not been able to foresee. For the most part, this has been for the better. Components have many benefits such as testability, simplification of larger problems, maintainability, and of course reusability. That last benefit is one that a lot of us gravitate to.

We all love to preach clean code and the evils of repeating ourselves, but when we start to focus on code reuse as the primary benefit of components, we start solving the wrong problems. Let’s journey together on why this happens and how to avoid it in our applications.

Travis Waith-Mair

The Non-Traditional Developer

Houston, Texas, United States