Speaker

Dino Esposito

Dino Esposito

CTO, Crionet

Rome, Italy

After 20+ books (mostly with Microsoft Press) that educated two generations of developers, 1000+ articles, hundreds of conference talks and 10000+ hours of training, Dino returned to software development and architecture. After two years of in energy, within his role as CTO of Crionet, Dino now leads the IT team that runs everyday, worldwide operations for professional tennis and padel. His latest publishing works are "Enterprise ASP.NET Blazor Applications" course on Pluralsight and "Clean Architecture with .NET" for Microsoft Press. Dino shares sharp and often counterstream thoughts on LinkedIn and pragmaticopinions.wordpress.com.

Area of Expertise

  • Information & Communications Technology
  • Media & Information

Topics

  • Software Design
  • Web
  • microservices
  • DDD
  • ASP.NET Core
  • C#.Net
  • Architecture
  • JavaScript
  • GPT
  • AI
  • NodeJS
  • ASP.NET

Bots and the new Frontier of UX

It’s been a very long time since the user interface of applications has become a crucial asset. Today, more than the UI itself is the process behind the UI that really matters and we call this user experience. The role of UX is making it smooth for users to go through familiar and effective processes while doing their job with the system. No matter the care we put in it (and the money we pay to designers) most the UI today is focused on creativity and design rather than effectiveness. It’s more wizard-based than dialog-based and wizards are more expensive to create the more you want them to be close to human expectations. This is just where the Bot Framework fits in. The Bot Framework is a new Azure service that lets you grab data from users and provide a service to users capturing input in an alternative way, for example as a Skype contact. This simple fact has a variety of effects not all of which are known at this time. In this talk, we’ll see how a Skype contact and a Web service can provide a (micro)service without a comprehensive Web site and backend.

Async Methods Revisited

In the .NET Framework and in the .NET Core Framework there’s a proliferation of async methods. In the C# language ad hoc keywords also make it trivially easy to implement async calls. The question is only one: when is async necessary? During the session we’ll start from a few ASP.NET (Core) examples to illustrate the possible benefits of async but also scenarios when async has more of some much ado for nothing. Fire-and-forget calls and true business parallelism will be analyzed as long as the use of async methods for data access through Entity Framework (Core).

ASP.NET Core Programming Practices

This workshop provides a comfortable learning path to ASP.NET Core that spans over all the topics a developer must know to use the framework and build and publish Web applications. Although completely new under the covers, ASP.NET Core still looks pretty familiar to many because of the close similarity with the ASP.NET MVC programming model. The workshop focuses on the parts that have been redesigned (runtime, middleware, DI) and the new peaks of potential performance it enables to reach. In the end, you’ll find a balanced mix of architectural descriptions and hands-on demos of how to tackle in ASP.NET Core the common tasks of a Web application: configuration, authentication, error handling, logging, rendering views, posting data, exposing JSON, and so forth.

ASP.NET Core Middleware

In ASP.NET Core any incoming requests ends up being managed by a controller class, but quite a few things can happen along the way. In particular, each request passes through a pipeline of components that are conceptually very close to the HTTP modules of the classic ASP.NET runtime environment. The pipeline is known as middleware and provides an API for your components to inspect or modify request and response payloads to pursue a specific business goal. In this talk, we’ll review the ASP.NET Core middleware API, go through a couple of examples and discuss use-cases and issues you may face while porting HTTP modules to ASP.NET Core middleware components.

Artificial Intelligence is Just Software

As controversial as it may sound, half the people who talk and write about artificial intelligence has never worked on any serious (or just toy) project. They talk AI (and machine and deep learning) by plain example, whether they are lawyers, sales, digital experts of some smoky kind, mid- and C-level executives. The other half of people who talk and write about AI are low-level developers, who can split in four the hair of a Python algorithm but hardly see the solution in the context of some real-world business. The purpose of this talk is combining together a long-term vision (both towards the past and the future) of technology with rock-solid knowledge of the software dynamics to identify some milestones of development. AI is simply software to write that doesn't come out of a pre-packaged product. From the customer's perspective AI is just software; from the development perspective it is a in-house platform to develop having clear problems, domains, and achievable results. It's (primarily) a matter of algorithms and it's not a matter of hype.

Artificial Intelligence for Decision Makers (and other too busy people)

Artificial Intelligence is only an umbrella term for a new branch of smarter software systems capable of solving real-world problems—sometimes, fairly tricky problems. As obvious as it may sound, you can’t have artificial intelligence if you don’t first identify the scenario you intend to address and the specific problem you want to solve. As a decision maker, it is key that you have at least a cursory understanding of intelligence in software and the technical tools you can use to make it happen. The session sets the (rather ambitious) goal of explaining what is artificial intelligence and how companies can realistically take advantage of it with well-targeted investments.

Anatomy of a Machine Learning Algorithm

Once lost in the wonderland of machine learning, our mind sometimes begins dreaming of self-determining applications capable of reading lips, scan bodies and, especially, control humans. The reality is that machine learning is only a bunch of smart mathematics and all it can do is getting numbers and returning numbers. Plain software applications are then responsible for using and consuming those numbers in possibly scary ways. In this session, we’ll demystify the alleged magic behind machine learning and, using linear regression as our driving vector, we’ll show what happens in the training phase, what happens in production and what’s ultimately stored in the trained model.

Alle fondamenta del futuro

Nei primi 20 anni di .NET questa che inizia con il rilascio di .NET 5 è davvero una nuova era in cui in qualche misura si riparte come se fosse il primo rilascio. .NET 5 è *finalmente* un organismo compatto, unico, per certi versi--diciamolo--monilitico (che non è una parolaccia). E' come la prima volta, ma vent'anni dopo. Si è lavorato sulla fondamenta, sulla performance a basso livello, su classi invisibili di cui non si parla mai ma che fanno il lavoro sporco tutti i momenti. Si è lavorato su pochi framework unificati, facendo chiarezza su chi fa cosa e come. Si è anche lavorato sui numeri, cioè sulla versione, perché per quanto possa suonare come una barzelletta, è tristemente vero che molti top manager scelgono sempre la versione più alta. E ora finalmente 5 è maggiore di 4 punto qualcosa!

10 Things A Tech Father Learned From a Son

Generally in software 5 years are measurable as a geological era. Being on the cutting edge of the technology and deep enough to write technical content and run projects for well 23 years is, well, an amazing result. How would you do that in a rapidly changing world--much more rapid that 20 years ago? Which soft and hard skills are necessary? What is the most beneficial definition of soft and hard skills? Is knowledge of technology and products still relevant to get a job? How would you communicate this to younger peers? A son can, in theory, emulate his father and even exceed him. To deal with change, the only thing that matters is the ability to understand (or just guess) the mechanics of change and predict what could happen. Over the years, though, in absence of maintenance the brain is encrusted and fresh energy from youngsters is the only remedy. So I went back to school and learned from my son. So in the end it happens that a father can, in theory, emulate his son and maybe exceed him!

A Tech Father and a Son

Generally in software 5 years are measurable as a geological era. Say you've been on the cutting edge of the technology for 25 years, deep enough to write technical content and build stuff. How would you communicate this to younger peers, including a special kind of younger peer like a son? A son can, in theory, emulate his father and even exceed him. To deal with change, the only thing that matters is the ability to understand (or just guess) the mechanics of change and predict what could happen. Over the years, though, in absence of maintenance the brain is encrusted and fresh energy from youngsters is the only remedy. So I went back to school and learned a few things from my tech son. So in the end, it happens that a father can, in theory, emulate his son and maybe exceed him!

Dino Esposito

CTO, Crionet

Rome, Italy

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