Joe Glombek

Information & Communications Technology

Umbraco .NET C# ASP.NET Accessibility Web Accessibility

Southampton, England, United Kingdom

Joe Glombek

Senior .NET developer and lover of adventure

Joe is a senior .NET developer and lover of adventure. During working hours he’s an Umbraco Certified Master and MVP who's been working with Umbraco in various digital agencies for the past decade, but is an adventure-loving outdoorsman in his free time and can often be seen out hiking or canoeing with his dog, Carter.

Current sessions

Working on work working for you

I used to live and breathe code but I started to get tired, so I've been working harder at working less. In this world where burnout, unpaid overtime, side projects and open source contributions are the normality I'll explain how we can be successful in our careers while still making time for what's important to us, knowing when to say no (in the office and with open source contributions) and how to escape the stress of work by heading outdoors.


Umbracadabra! Defence Against the Dark Arts of Magic Strings

I'm sure many of us have been told at some point in our careers that "magic strings are evil" but why exactly is that and what could go wrong? We use the phrase "magic strings" to mean a constant string used in code to refer to something (think `Model.GetPropertyValue("bodyText")`) But what alternatives are there and how can we use them to improve our development? We'll take a look at effective use of enums, constants and some Umbraco-specific tips and tricks.


Why are you being such a git about it?

Are your git repos a dumping ground for code? I'm really fussy about how people use git - and that's a good thing. We'll take a look at branching strategies, the importance of commit messages and how often should you commit, anyway? Let's investigate how, with 5 simple tips, we can turn a code dump into a glorious archive of software and how this can save time, frustration and money.


Mapping our journey to accessibility: What we can learn about accessibility from maps

Accessibility is a fairly new concept to a lot of us in the tech industry, but Ordnance Survey have been making maps since 1791. What have they done over the last two centuries to make their maps easier to read and understand for everyone? And how can our comparatively juvenile industry learn from their experience?


Past and future events

Tech A11y Summit

15 Dec 2021

DDD 2021

27 Nov 2021
Reading, England, United Kingdom

Umbraco Codegarden 2021

9 Jun 2021 - 11 Jun 2021